TAKUYA YADA - 7 FRAGMENTS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS (Independent)

 

                                   (Review by Stefan)

At the age of 17, Takuya Yada bought his first guitar because one day, he wanted to take the world by surprise with shred guitar tactics. He became an industrious student at the Music Institute in Osaka Japan where he graduated in glory. Takuya decided to explore some new horizons in hope to find a new package of inspirations, therefore he moved on to the UK where he stayed for a couple of years. As a kid, he grew up with English Choral music so I guess that must have been the main reason he headed to the United Kingdom for a while.

 

During this stay, he (re)formed Black Despair UK and released a first EP plus full- length album entitled “Broken System Bring Chaos”. Also they played a couple of shows in London. Takuya also collaborated with UK based Metal band Stuka Squadron’s during the recordings of their second album “New Sound Of War”. He found in the UK what he was looking for, a new source of inspiration and headed back to Japan in 2013. Coming back home, loaded with a huge backpack filled up with new plans and ambitions, he was ready for the next step in his young career… bringing out a debut solo album which is already released as from June, 21.  Entitled “7 Fragments Of The Unconscious”, fans of world class, detailed manicured shred guitar tactics better be prepared for this masterpiece.

 

“7 Fragments Of The Unconscious” was recorded at the Banckstock Studios in London, produced by Nikhil Suresh and the master himself, Takuya Yada who also composed all of the great compositions on board. In charge for all guitars, bass and keyboards movements, one (totally unknown individual to me) named Harrison takes the drum parts for his account. Dignity for the drummer but allow me to say that Takuya Yada is the main protagonist here, damn right he’s a fantastic multi instrumentalist. If you are authorized to achieve an instrumental album like this, you were born with a true gift from heaven. That’s why “7 Fragments Of The Unconscious” is the final product of a natural born guitar player to me!

 

On his first solo album “7 Fragments Of The Unconscious”, you hear nothing else but high quality guitar wizardry. Mainly, there is a lot attention paid to guitar virtuosity used to know from the 80s and early 90s era. Checking out the entire effort, guitar gods like Tony MacAlpine, Jason Becker, Vinnie Moore, Marty Friedman, Joe Satriani, George Lynch, Steve Vai and Paul Gilbert come refresh my memory. One by one musicians who have stolen my heart back in the days. For many people, the effort to keep their attention optimal during a full instrumental album seems impossible. That’s why I’d like to recommend Takuya Yada’s solo album to shred guitar Metal maniacs only.  All the possible guitar tactics that you can imagine are offered here with a lot of talent. The sensitivity and the perfection this guy deals with is captivating good… memorable riffs with much emotion punctured leads caressing my eardrums during the whole playing time. Rhythmic spoken, many variation is provided as well. From the quite speedy to up-tempo velocities and from subdued rhythms to fusion tinted passages, somehow guitar master Takuya Yada serves it all in a masterful way.

 

My statement about “7 Fragments Of The Unconscious”: each and every fan of purebred shred guitar Metal movements should order the album right on. I have enough knowledge to realize that TY is able to fill all expectations, even with distinction! Check out the promotion video HERE.  Watch for his official homepage at: http://takuyayada.com/  My own list featuring world class guitar magicians will be adapted within a few moments.

 

My Points: 84 / 100

 

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95+ : Outstanding, high valued albums & Classic Ones… a direct purchase is advisable !

 

Between 90 and 95: Surpasses the style of music, must be heard/ordered by every Metal fan

 

Between 80 and 89: Good in its own genre, recommended for those hooked on it

 

Between 70 and 79: Decent but best previewing

 

Between 60 and 69: Rather moderate

 

Between 50 and 59: Bad, substandard

 

50- : Rubbish